Bing Peak by Crosby Mountain / 靠克羅斯比山的賓峯

We had just begun to see snow in the mountains last week. But more of it has arrived before this weekend. The goal was to climb Crosby Mountain. But the fresh powder forced us to seek the adventure on the nearby Bing Peak instead.

Bing Peak in the mist
Bing Peak in the mist

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Bing Peak at a Glance

Access: Money Creek Road (NF-6420)
Round Trip: TBD
Elevation Range: 1240′-4500′
Gear: snowshoes, microspikes
GPS Track: available
Dog-Friendly: no

Bing Peak South Slopes

We drove two miles from the Money Creek Road turnoff–3.5 miles from Highway 2. I parked the car at the first junction. Then we started walking on the abandoned roadbed. Soon, we scrambled uphill by the second road bend. We worked our way up through down trees and brush to 2200′. Later, we came upon snow at 3000′.

Following sporadic animal tracks, we stayed to the right of the streambed on the southern slopes. Then at 3200′, we moved west into a broad, talus gully. The ravine, adorned with fall foliage, had views out to Lennox Mountain. We slowly made it to the other side while the spires of Bing Peak loomed overhead.

Guardians of the forest
Guardians of the forest

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On the Ridgeline

For the next 1000′, we went up the steep rib east of the gully. I put on snowshoes on the 4150′ saddle. Then we continued west on the ridge through fresh powder. But the new snow made climbing Crosby Mountain an overly ambitious day-long endeavor. So we turned around at Point 4494 south of the quarry.

On the way back to the saddle, we found a frozen pond in the meadow. From there, I was able to catch a glimpse of Bing Peak through the forest. As we made our way down the mountain, I decided to check out the peak.

Tiny pond
Tiny pond

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Bing Peak Climb

The steep west face was not conducive to a direct ascent. So we needed to go around back to the other side of the gully. From the south side, we would then seek out a feasible option. I didn’t have any route information. But I thought we would at least try it first. The warm afternoon temperatures produced constant snow bombs in the forest.

Later, I put on microspikes east of the gully. Then we climbed up the steep south slopes. There were outcrops to bypass. But overall, it was smooth sailing until we came to a headwall. The left of it led to nowhere. But I noticed a notch on the right. So we went to check out the other side. Then before us was another rock wall with a broken ridgeline.

IMG_5245
Hidden gully

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The Final Stretch

We nearly turned around there. But I realized there was a hidden gully below us as I looked closer. So we climbed up from the left of the ravine and moved through more rocks and cliffs. At the top was yet another headwall. Dang! But we were able to bypass that one from the right. Later, we found another notch at 4350′. At last, it allowed us to go up the east ridge.

I wasn’t sure whether we would see any more cliffs. So the last 100′ climb, we slowly moved up the ridgeline. Meanwhile, we went through dense growth growing on top of snow-covered boulders. Later, I mistook the knob on the ridge for the top. The real summit was not yet visible, but it wasn’t far behind!

Crosby Mountain from Bing Peak
Crosby Mountain from Bing Peak

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Bing Peak Summit Plus Outro

It was another woodsy summit. But views toward Cleveland Mountain were excellent. Glad there was also an opening on the north side. So from there, I saw Baring Mountain and Gunn Peak. Trees blocked our view to the northwest. So I never saw Palmer Mountain from the top.

We followed our steps on the way down. While we were still on the ridge, we got to see the South Fork Skykomish River Valley. The afternoon snow had turned slushy. The slopes were now slippery. But the direct descent allowed us to drop 3000′ down to the car in two hours.

Thanks for a lovely day
Thanks for a lovely day

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