2018/10/20 – Crosby Mountain / 克羅斯比山

The Crosby Show
The Crosby Show

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Access: Money Creek Road (NF-6420)
Round Trip: 10 miles
Elevation Range: 1,240′-5,520′
Gear: helmet, microspikes

Last year our unsuccessful attempt to this mountain had us resort to Bing Peak during the same trip. With the late snow arrival this year, I knew we’d have a better chance at making the long, tedious ridge approach to the top and back without having to hike out in the dark.

Same approach different year
Same approach different year

Photos from this trip can be found here.

I parked at the exact same spot off Money Creek Road at 3.5 miles in from Highway 2. Using the same approach as before while occasionally following game trails, we slowly made our way up the steep south slopes while staying to the right of a small stream.

Good morning
Good morning

Photos from this trip can be found here.

At 3,200′, we crossed the open, talus gully with views of Lennox Mountain across the Money Creek Valley. Back in the forest and for the next one thousand feet, we climbed the north-northwest trending rib to the 4,160′ saddle west of Bing Peak. I put on microspikes to gain more traction on the duff through this steep section.

Gully crossing
Gully crossing

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Having gone through the first part of the ridge last year, we were able to quickly travel westward to Point 4494 while getting through several meadows. We negotiated this point by dropping into the chasm halfway over the top and getting around from the south side before getting ourselves back onto the ridge.

A preview
A preview

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Surprisingly, on the other side of the outcrop was a path, which looked too defined to be a game trail. The trail wound its way in and out of the forest and over several meadows before taking a nosedive by the cliffs at 4,200′. Two short and steep switchbacks through cliffs put us down at a large meadow with a group of unnamed ponds.

One of several ponds
One of several ponds

Photos from this trip can be found here.

We got around the ponds from the south, occasionally fought our way through heavy brush, to Cement Lake at 4,080′. From west of the lake and for the next 800′, we began the tedious traverse through a large talus field and zigzagged through hidden cliffs, gullies, and chasms.

Welcoming
Welcoming

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Despite smooth contour lines shown on the map, actual terrain was anything but. We made many stops figuring out ways around the unexpected, albeit minor, cruxes. It was interesting to see more and more granite rocks the closer we got to Boner Lake. The lake itself nestled in a basin filled with abundant, beautiful granite slabs.

Boner Lake at last
Boner Lake at last

Photos from this trip can be found here.

We walked to west end of the lake via the north shore and followed a wide, granite rock gully to attain Crosby Mountain’s south ridge between two minor knobs. From west of the ridge crest, we traversed to the southeast saddle between the summit tower and Point 5290.

There you are
There you are

Photos from this trip can be found here.

From the saddle we traversed the ridge crest to 5,400′ before stopping below the mountain’s precipitous south face. At the base of the summit block I located a ramp between the cliffs and thick shrubs and got around to the west side for more route finding fun.

Precipitous south face
Precipitous south face

Photos from this trip can be found here.

A hidden heather gully on the west got us one step closer, but it ended just below the summit rocks. I carefully searched for gaps between dense shrubs and the cliffs, eventually I located some large rocks on which we were able to prop ourselves and finish the final scramble to the top.

North panoramic view
North panoramic view

Photos from this trip can be found here.

What a great vantage point to take in views of both Alpine Lakes Wilderness and Wild Sky Wilderness! The summit certainly felt much taller than its shorter neighbors we had climbed, like Palmer Mountain, Cleveland Mountain, Philadelphia Mountain, and Melted Mountain from earlier this year.

South panoramic view
South panoramic view

Photos from this trip can be found here.

We enjoyed a one-hour warm and windless summit stay before reversing the route back down to the lakes. Repeating the tedious ridge traverse, we got back to the west saddle of Bing Peak at dusk. Then we descended the hard-earned 2,500′ on the steep south slopes through the aforementioned talus gully back to the car after dark.

Thanks for another safe outing
Thanks for another safe outing

Photos from this trip can be found here.

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