Lord Hill Regional Park / 洛德山丘地方公園

Like yesterday, I hoped to stay closer to home by checking out Cougar Mountain finally. But despite the promising weather outlook, this morning, Issaquah was foggy with drizzles. So I sat in the Starbucks parking and flipped through reports. Then I stumbled across Lord Hill Regional Park. Guess we wouldn’t stay close to home, after all!

Lord Hill Beaver Lodge Pond
Lord Hill Beaver Lodge Pond

See more trip photos here.

Lord Hill Regional Park at a Glance

Access: South Lower Parking Lot (official park website)
Round Trip: 5 miles
Elevation Range: 40′-626′
Gear: none
GPS Track: available
Dog-Friendly: yes

Getting to the South Lower Parking Lot

There were several options to get inside the park. But since we came from the south, we would need to take Tester Road first. From there, we’d drive west toward the Snohomish River. But instead of taking the road right off the exit, I went back on the freeway by mistake. Then I had to turn back around in Maltby to repeat the process.

This park didn’t look huge on the map. So initially, I thought about including Bald Hill on our outing. But as it turned out, the summit was smack in the backyard of a house. So I decided not to bother exploring it. Then we would enjoy our walk in other parts of the park as planned.

A muddy day
A muddy day

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Lord Hill Trail System

To get inside the trail system, we walked uphill for under a quarter of a mile. From there, the exploratory possibilities were endless. But I used my favorite WTA low-key trip reporter‘s writeup for this trip. Except that we hiked counterclockwise. So we first reached the top of the Pipeline Trail adorned with a kiosk. Then we began looping through the area. It started to drizzle then.

We were in the forest most of the time. The trail went through the woods and then came up to Marsh Lake. Perhaps it’s the low water level. But the lake looked more like a swamp. We couldn’t get closer to the shore because of the dense brush. I was too unmotivated to bushwhack. Interestingly, the official park map was the only place I could find the names of the lakes.

Marsh Lake
Marsh Lake

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Hiking in Lord Hill Regional State Park

At the next junction, we headed north on the Marsh Lake Loop. There were more moss-covered trees through this area. Once we got onto the Pond Loop, we were nearing the east shore of Temple Pond. It’s the most significant body of water in this park. We got a closer look at the lakeshore via the short loop trail. A few ducks were swimming carefreely nearby.

Just past Temple Pond was the Dragonfly Pond. We stopped there briefly and then continued north at the next junction. There were many tall timbers through this part of the trail. So we stopped off to the side of the trail and took a break. The pup has been napping in my pack. Glad he hasn’t said, aka moaned, much on this trip.

A path goes through it
A path goes through it

See more trip photos here.

Onward to View Peak

A couple of groups walked past us during our rest. Then afterward, we continued north on the trail. The path eventually took us out of the forest back onto the Pipeline Trail. We hiked south for a little over a quarter of a mile before getting on the Rock Candy Trail. After intersecting Midway 3, we then took the View Peak Loop Trail up to the summit.

There was another trail circling the summit. We walked clockwise with plants over our heads through a couple of openings. Clouds were too low to get a good look at the park. Before finishing the loop, we came out of the forest and went onto the lookout area. On a clear day, this spot would have been perfect to see the Snohomish River Valley.

Summit dogs on View Peak
Summit dogs on View Peak

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Outro

We exited through Liquid Bread and Quarry Trail. But before getting down to the river shore, we first walked past the Beaver Lodge Pond. A few ducks were swimming on the water. There we saw our first person today, and we briefly chatted. They were doing a loop hike also but coming in from the north.

Eventually, we hiked down to the Steamshovel Trail. But I didn’t bother with checking out the Riverside Trail. So we continued walking on the path until we finally got back to the parking lot.

Hidden treasure
Hidden treasure

See more trip photos here.

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