Sherpani Peak + Paddy-Go-North / 雪帕妮峯+帕迪谷北峯

Sherpani Peak once last time
Sherpani Peak once last time

See more trip photos here.

Yesterday I climbed American Border Peak in one long day. The lack of water sources had me rethink my original plan to stay the night. While on the summit, I texted my friend via inReach to drop off the pup back at the house. I thought it’d be nice to take the dog out today since I ended up having a free day.

Paddy-Go-North and Sherpani Peak are next-door neighbors to the north of Paddy-Go-Easy Pass. They are part of the series of bumps on the ridgeline that extends southward from Granite Mountain. This trip was a last-minute idea since I didn’t have anything else planned.

The Lowdown on Shepani Peak and Paddy-Go-North

Access: Paddy-Go-Easy Pass Trailhead
Round Trip: TBD

Elevation Range: 3360′-6720′
Gear: helmet
GPS Track: available

Paddy-Go-Easy Pass Trail

I slept in after yesterday’s climb, so we didn’t leave the house until late morning. It was past 1 PM when we started hiking in hot weather. But glad we started out in the shade. We were here late last fall, climbing Tucquala Peak and Paddy-Go-South. So this time I thought we’d come back for these two high points north of the pass.

After walking through the lower forest, the initially moderate hike soon became steep. But the number of switchbacks offset the elevation gain, so it was still manageable. We ran into a ranger on the trail who was on the way up to Sprite Lake. The terrain eased up past 5400′. Then we left the trail at 5600′ and moved toward Paddy-Go-North.

First sighting of Mount Daniel
First sighting of Mount Daniel

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Aiming for the 6150′ Saddle

Since Sherpani Peak sat farther on the ridge, I wanted to climb it first. Then we’d work our way south to Paddy-Go-North. From there, we would find our way down to Paddy-Go-Easy Pass and hike out. We headed north in the forest and soon came out into the clearing. There we saw the impressive southern cliffs of Paddy-Go-North overhead. We then headed northwest through a broad talus field.

On the other side of the field, we were back on heather slopes. Following one of the many trails and we eventually went up to the saddle overlooking the other side. The Cradle above the French Creek drainage dominated the eastern skyline. From there, we moved north through a small talus field. Shortly, we were on the east saddle of Point 6564.

Traversing talus
Traversing talus

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Sherpani Peak Climb

We got our first full view of Sherpani Peak. The broken ridgeline didn’t look conducive for traversing. So we went through another talus basin with snow patches. The pup got to roll around in them. Shortly, we got up to Sherpani Peak’s south saddle and began boulder hopping through the southeast face. Through heather slopes and slabs, we quickly made our way up to the east ridge.

Judging by the terrain, the best way to get to the top was from the north. So with more effort, we climbed up through many boulders to reach the summit block. The stacked rocks needed some mantle moves to get up. The big boulder perching on the summit required getting up a big step. I propped the pup up to the top, knowing that he would be able to hop off.

Final scramble
Final scramble

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Sherpani Peak Summit Plus Outro

Views up here were similar to those on Tucquala Peak and Paddy-Go-South. The Cradle and Nursery Peak dominated the east side of the French Creek Valley. Other known high points included Goat Mountain, Mount Daniel, Granite Mountain (Teanaway), and Hawkins Mountain. Views to the north and the south were just as excellent.

After an extended summit visit, we began to make our way back down. Getting off the summit rock was a little tricky for me. But with a good stretch in the leg, I was ablet o reach a foothold on the side. It helped to get down onto the platform below. We reversed our route through the boulders and got back down into the basin toward our next objective: Paddy-Go-North.

East-to-south panoramic view
East-to-south panoramic view

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En Route to Paddy-Go-South

For the most part, we were able to traverse on the ridge. At first, the route to Paddy-Go-South looked straightforward. But as we got closer to the summit, a deep notch stopped us at our tracks. The hidden, broken ridge came as a complete surprise. As a result, we went down the north slopes so we could bypass the crux.

Without snow, the terrain felt choppy. Luckily, after doing some digging, we located a ramp below the notch. Then we used it to get up to the north slopes below the summit. Once we got up to the top, came another surprise: mosquitoes! Fortunately, the periodic breezes kept out most of them during our brief stay.

Final scramble
Final scramble

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Paddy-Go-North Summit

The views were more or less the same as Sherpani Peak. I didn’t take as many photos up here as a result. The evening sun was beginning to bring out more colors. Meanwhile, it was casting shadows on high points over on the western horizon.

After our short stay, we began our descent to Paddy-Go-Easy Pass. Then something else stopped us at our tracks. The map showed smooth contour lines on the southeast ridge. But it was not the case. There was a significant drop-off, so it wasn’t conducive for scrambling. So instead, we headed down the northeast slopes. Then I found a suitable place to get off the buttresses.

Sherpani Peak
Sherpani Peak

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Outro

We made a quick stop on Paddy-Go-Easy Pass. Then we began the fast descent back down to the trailhead and got back just before it became completely dark.

On Paddy-Go-Easy Pass
On Paddy-Go-Easy Pass

See more trip photos here.

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