Goat Slam via Panther Creek / 經豹溪上山羊滿貫

Sunrise Peak up ahead
Sunrise Peak up ahead

See more trip photos here.

For Sunrise Peak in the Lake Chelan-Sawtooth Wilderness, see this post. For Sherman Peak in the Mount Baker Wilderness, see this post.

The Lowdown on Goat Slam

Goat Slam = Sunrise Peak 8144 + Sherman Peak 8204
山羊滿貫=日出峯8144 +雪曼峯8204

Access: Road 5200-300
Round Trip: TBD
Elevation Range: 4600′-8204′
Gear: helmet
GPS Track: available

The Preface

The original plan was to spend the night on Sunrise Peak and then climb Sherman Peak the next day. But hot weather and the unlikelihood of finding a water source on the ridge had me reconsider. So, I decided that we’d be better off getting both peaks in one long day. Otherwise, keeping ourselves entertained in hot weather didn’t seem like a fun idea.

Goat Creek crossing
Goat Creek crossing

See more trip photos here.

En Route to Panther Creek

NF-52 hasn’t changed much since our visit over Memorial Day weekend. Road 300 was in better conditions than expected. There was even new gravel to level out washed out sections. Other than removing a few big rocks, no issues in getting through the entire section in a low-clearance vehicle. We received a warm welcome from the curious roaming cattle before reaching the empty parking area.

The trail appeared to be in great shape despite being remote. We enjoyed a leisurely one-mile hike to the hidden trail junction at 5000′. But not before we missed it by a quarter of a mile before realizing we had gone too far. We backtracked and found the old trail leading down to the shallow Goat Creek. Just on the other side, the elevation picked up right away. The path moved through steep hills and then went up into Panther Creek Basin.

Bullhorn Peak
Bullhorn Peak

See more trip photos here.

En Route to Sunrise Peak

The trail stayed east of the creek until it gradually faded higher up in the basin. We stayed on track by following cut trees until we reached the open meadow at 6400′. There was our first sighting of Bullhorn Peak. Scrambling toward the head of the basin, we got up to Sunrise Peak south-east ridge saddle at 7400′. So we were now west of Point 7392. There we got our first look at both destinations of the Goat Slam. We could also see The Craggies.

We headed west on the rocky ridge crest while gaining a few hundred feet of elevation. Then we got up to Sunrise Peak south ridge at 7760′. The views behind us to the south were immense. We traveled north on the gentle ridgeline onto the broad summit. McLeod Mountain‘s north side looked daunting compared with its moderate south ridge. The north face of Silver Star Mountain, together with Silver Moon and Vasiliki Ridge, was my favorite of all.

Silver Moon, Silver Star, Vasiliki Ridge
Silver Moon, Silver Star, Vasiliki Ridge

See more trip photos here.

Rn Route to Sherman Peak

The 80-degree weather felt significantly cooler thanks to the summit breeze. The pup and I stayed for an hour before making our way down into Goat Creek Basin. Sherman Peak was next on the menu. First, we averaged an elevation of 6200′ on open terrain. Then we moved through several ravines in the forest before arriving at Sherman Peak south-west ridge. Traveling east on the west ridge, we then entered the northeast-trending scree gully at 7000′.

With open views behind us, we slowly moved through the steep part of the gully from 7200′ to 7400′. Then a dirt path took us up to just below a slab wall. An exposed ramp in the slabs then got us out of the steep terrain. That, in turn, put us on the moderate ground from 7400′ onward. We enjoyed a leisurely walk through heather and minor taluses for the final 800′. The summit was another excellent vantage point with impressive views both up and down the Isabella Ridge.

Big Craggy Peak
Big Craggy Peak

See more trip photos here.

Outro

Most peaks to the west were now in the shadow of the afternoon clouds. Views were still gorgeous nonetheless. The Big Craggy Peak certainly lived up to its name, enormous and, craggy. Pups and I shared many memorable moments climbing The Craggies. It was the first backpacking trip for the three of us. Good times!

After soaking in the views, pup and I then started making our way down Isabella Ridge. We went through a couple of high points to Sweetgrass Ridge. The area had undergone wildfires, and it took some time to get through all the down trees. On the 5800′ saddle south of Sweetgrass Ridge high point, we first turned right (west). Then we followed the drainage down 1200′ and came out onto Road 300. It was nice to see the car as broke out into the clearing.

Thanks for another glorious day
Thanks for another glorious day

See more trip photos here.

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