Glory Slam via Andrews Creek / 安德魯斯溪到榮耀滿貫

The other three climbing objectives from Peepsight Mountain
The other three climbing objectives from Peepsight Mountain

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The Lowdown on Glory Slam

Glory Slam = Andrew Peak + Amos Peak + Peepsight Mountain + Freds Mountain
榮耀滿貫=安德魯峯+阿摩司峯+窺視山+佛瑞德山

Access: Andrews Creek Trailhead
Round Trip: 38 miles
Elevation Range: 3040′-8301′
Gear: helmet
GPS Track: available

Happy Seattle Pride weekend!

First backpacking trip with the pup this season, and Pasayten Wilderness was once again calling our names! The most recent trip we took to the wilderness was last year climbing Mount Rolo and Devils Peak.

Most parties typically would likely add an extra day to the itinerary to truly enjoy the trip. Sadly, I had just two days to spare. So I wanted to try climbing all four peaks on my list to avoid the same long approach. The Andrews Creek Trail felt too long for a two-day outing.

The lupine-accented trail along Andrews Creek
The lupine-accented trail along Andrews Creek

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Car Camping at the Trailhead

The drive on Chewuch Road from the turnoff in Winthrop to Andrews Creek Trailhead was smooth sailing. A few cattle guards along the way, but in great shape for the entire stretch. We car camped on another Friday night to get an early start.

Two other vehicles at the trailhead early Saturday morning as we began hiking. Low clouds in the morning with limited views to the upper valley.

Down tree cleared
Down tree cleared

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Andrews Creek Trail

It was evident that the trail had received lots of work. It was clear of tree debris for 8.5 miles to the south Peepsight Trail junction. The occasional stream crossings, big brush, and mud puddles in some areas didn’t pose any significant issues.

I had a brief exchange with a horse rider we met by the junction. She informed me that the crew typically came in after the Fourth of July weekend clear out Peepsight Trail.

Horse rider by Peepsight Trail junction
Horse rider by Peepsight Trail junction

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Cross-Country Approach to Rock Lake

Lots of down trees at half a mile past the junction had slowed us down significantly. One mile shy of Andrews Pass, we left the trail and shortcut up to north Peepsight Trail. The path was hard to locate and even harder to follow once finding it.

Someone was kind enough to have placed many one-rock cairns along the way. We reached Rock Lake in 1.5 miles, then immediately left for Andrew Peak after setting up camp.

Through down trees
 Through down trees

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Black Bear Sighting Near Lakeshore

The minute we heard screeching sounds in the forest, my heart skipped. Apparently, after spotting our presence, two bear pup had quickly climbed up a tall tree above the eastern lakeshore. As a result, my plan to ascend southwest ridge was no longer feasible.

Without the need to further access the situation, we quickly retreated and headed to the opposite side of the lake. I wanted to be out of the pups’ hair before the mama bear saw us as a potential threat. I made lots of noises as we walked away.

Rock Lake backed by Peepsight Mountain
Rock Lake backed by Peepsight Mountain

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South Ridge as an Alternative Route

After making a counterclockwise loop to the north shore, we proceeded to climb up on the south ridge instead. Lots of hidden ramps and ledges amid the granite rock slabs to get ourselves up.

Higher up on the ridge, the terrain went from mostly heather slopes to the talus. We attained the flattish ridgeline at 8200′ and scrambled another 100′ north toward the summit before topping out.

Final scramble
Final scramble

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Andrew Peak Summit

There were excellent views of the basins and valleys. I also got a good look at Peepsight and Freds Mountains, our day two’s objectives west of Glory Creek Basin. The stoic Remmel Mountain had been staring us down with its daunting west face.

Of the four summits we visited, this one had the least comfortable seating. It’s also the only one with a summit register from Fay Pullen.

Peepsight Mountain
Peepsight Mountain

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En Route to Amos Peak

I browsed through the few pages of register entries. Then I noticed that someone cleverly corrected the name by adding an “s” to the word Andrew. The naming convention for Andrews Creek, Andrews Pass, or Andrews Trail didn’t apply here.

Grr. I erased the “s” from the name. An hour of enjoyable, albeit windy, stay, we started moving north toward our second objective of the day–Amos Peak.

Next stop, Amos Peak
Next stop, Amos Peak

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7800′ Saddle to Amos Peak Summit

The rocks became progressively larger the farther north we traversed. So we avoided the giant boulders by traveling west of the ridge crest. Then we slowly moved toward the 7800′ saddle between the two peaks. The talus was mostly stable.

From the saddle, we continued to travel north on more talus through the burned zone. Before long, we finally made it to the broad summit of Amos Peak. Views up here were just as good and very much the same as those on Andrew Peak. Only at a slightly different perspective and farther north.

Back at ya, Andrew Peak
Back at ya, Andrew Peak

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Back to Rock Lake Camp

I didn’t’ want to run the ridge back to camp through Andrew Peak. So on the descent, we dropped down past the saddle to 7400′. From there, we made a rising traverse between Andrew Peak’s steep west face and the meadow below. Then we got up to the southwest ridge at 7600′.

Just in case the bears were still around, we got back to the south ridge by rounding the ridgel. Then we retraced our route back down to camp by the lake.

Goodnight Amos
Goodnight Amos

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Glorious Day Two

The next morning, we headed for Crazy Man Pass to climb Peepsight Mountain. Much of this area had been through wildfires, so the trail was virtually nonexistent. Thankfully, there were more one-rock cairns to guide the way.

From the pass, the north ridge route looked doable. So we bypassed Point 7990 from the south slopes to the south saddle. It took a much shorter time to get there from the Crazy Man Pass than expected. We were now looking at Peepsight Mountain’s north ridge.

Looking back
Looking back

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Breakfast on Peepsight Mountain

The north ridge route turned out to be rather straightforward and gentler. For the most part, we traversed on or east of the ridge crest. Along the way, there were a couple of minor knobs and boulders to bypass. But overall, no issues.

We enjoyed a good hour of breakfast on the summit while savoring beautiful morning views. Then afterward, we left for our next objective: Freds Mountain. As always, mountains tended to look much farther than on the map.

Peepsight awaits
Peepsight awaits

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Next Stop, Freds Mountain

This ridge traverse was about three times longer than going from Andrew Peak to Amos Peak. Except there were several more knobs to bypass. We had so much fun boulder hopping and sidestepping on the slopes.

Wilma was the last high point just south of Freds Mountain. To get around the peak, we kept a steady elevation of 7600′ on its western slopes.

Ashnola River Basin with Peepsight Lake
Ashnola River Basin with Peepsight Lake

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Long-Running Ridge Traverse

I first mistook Wilma for Fred Mountain’s actual summit until I was able to peek around Wilma at 7800′. OMG, there was more, at least another half a mile to go!

Though, this part of the ridge was much gentler and much easier to traverse. So in turn, we avoided lots of dense brush on the west by staying on the crest.

Within reach
Within reach

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Freds Mountain Summit

Of all the summits we visited in the last two days, Freds Mountain was the roomiest and the most elongated. There was more than enough room and then some to house an entire army. It even had a tall cairn marking the highest point. Otherwise, it was hard to tell.

Another excellent viewpoint on this warm and sunny day!

Back at ya, Peepsight
Back at ya, Peepsight

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Shortcutting Down to Glory Lake Basin

There was no reason for us to traverse the long-running ridge again. So I poked around the top and found a way down the steep northeast ridge. Eventually, we exited from the adjacent gully. In turn, this route got us down to the boggy and mosquito-infested Glory Creek Basin. Joy!

Even though we came upon lots of loose rocks and choss in the gully, it saved us lots of time. The last thing I wanted to do was to reverse the ridge route back to Peepsight Mountain.

Northeast gully outro
Northeast gully outro

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Meandering Through Burned Forest

Since the basin had through fires, we never located the trail shown on the map. So instead, we followed the creek on the east. Then we gradually climbed up to the 7200′ saddle just east of Glory Lake.

Beyond the saddle, we found the trail from this morning. Then we followed the cairns back to our campsite at Rock Lake. Glad not to have seen any more bears since yesterday’s brief encounter!

Glory Creek Basin north view
Glory Creek Basin north view

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Long Hike Back to the Trailhead

Back at camp, it felt as though we had used up all of our energy for the day. So we took a much-needed power nap before packing up. Then it was the 13-mile hike plus some scramble back out to the car.

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