2018/6/23-24 – Glory Slam / 榮耀滿貫

Other three climbing objectives from Peepsight Mountain
Other three climbing objectives from Peepsight Mountain

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Access: Andrews Creek Trailhead
Round Trip: 38 miles
Elevation Range: 3040′-8301′
Gear: helmet

Glory Slam = Andrew Peak + Amos Peak + Peepsight Mountain + Freds Mountain
榮耀滿貫=安德魯峯+阿摩司峯+窺視山+佛瑞德山

Happy Seattle Pride weekend! First backpacking trip with the pup this season and Pasayten was calling our names! We visited this wilderness in fall of last year while climbing Mount Rolo and Devils Peak.

Most parties would likely add an extra day to the itinerary and make this a leisure trip. Since I only had two days to spare, I wanted to see about getting all the peaks on my list in one trip to avoid repeating the same long approach.

Note to self: add an extra day to similar future trips for true enjoyment.

Lupine-accented trail
 Lupine-accented trail

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Chewich Road to Andrews Creek Trailhead was in great shape. A few cattle guards along the way, but smooth sailing for the entire stretch from the turnoff in Winthrop. Another night spent in the car to get an early start. Two other vehicles at the trailhead early Saturday morning as we began hiking. Low clouds in the morning with limited views to the upper valley.

Down tree cleared
Down tree cleared

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Lots of work had been put into clearing the trail of tree debris all the way to the south Peepsight Trail junction at 8.5 miles in. The occasional stream crossings, tall brush, and mud puddles in some areas didn’t pose any major concerns. A horse rider we met by the junction kindly informed us that a crew was to come in after the Fourth of July weekend to work on clearing out the Peepsight Trail.

Horse rider by Peepsight Trail junction
Horse rider by Peepsight Trail junction

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Lots of down trees at half a mile past the junction had slowed us down significantly. One mile shy of Andrews Pass, we left the trail and shortcut up to north Peepsight Trail. The trail was hard to locate and even harder to follow once locating it. Someone was kind enough to have placed many one-rock cairns along the way. We reached Rock Lake in 1.5 miles, then immediately left for Andrew Peak after setting up camp.

Through down trees
 Through down trees

Photos from this trip can be found here.

My plan to ascend southwest ridge was quickly halted when we heard screeching sounds of two bear pups, as they hastily climbed up a tall tree above the east lake shore after spotting our presence. We quickly turned around and headed to the opposite side of the lake to be out of their hair, before mama bear showed up and saw us as a potential threat. I made lots of noises as we walked away.

Rock Lake
Rock Lake

Photos from this trip can be found here.

After making a counterclockwise loop to the north shore, we proceeded to ascend the south ridge instead. Lots of ramps and ledges weaving amid granite rock slabs to get ourselves up. Mostly talused terrain higher up on the ridge. We attained the flattish ridge at 8,200′ and scrambled another 100′ north toward the summit before topping out.

Final scramble
Final scramble

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Immense views into the basins and valleys, as well as Peepsight and Freds Mountains, our day two’s objectives west of Glory Creek Basin. The stoic Remmel Mountain had been staring us down with its daunting west face. Of the four summits we visited, this was the only one with a summit register (by Fay Pullen) and with the least comfortable seating.

Peepsight Mountain
Peepsight Mountain

Photos from this trip can be found here.

As I browsed through the few pages of register entries, I noticed that someone cleverly corrected the peak name by adding an “s” to the word “Andrew,” unaware of the fact that the name did not follow the same naming convention as “Andrews Creek,” “Andrews Pass,” or “Andrews Trail.” Grr…I erased the “s” from the name. An hour of enjoyable, albeit windy, stay, we started moving north toward our second objective of the day–Amos Peak.

Next stop, Amos Peak
Next stop, Amos Peak

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Rocks got progressively larger the farther north we traversed, so we avoided the giant boulders and big rock steps by gradually descending toward the 7,800′ saddle between the two peaks. Continuing traveling north from the saddle on talus and through more burned area, we finally made it to the broad summit of Amos Peak. Views were just as good up here and similar to those of Andrew Peak, but at a slightly different perspective and farther north.

Back at ya, Andrew Peak
Back at ya, Andrew Peak

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Without needing to run the ridge back to camp through Andrew Peak, on the descent we dropped down to 7,400′ past the saddle, then made a rising traverse between Andrew Peak’s steep west face and the meadow below to the southwest ridge at 7,600′. Just in case the bears were still hanging around, we rounded off the ridge crest back to the south ridge and retraced our route down to the lake.

Good night Amos
Good night Amos

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Next morning we headed for Crazy Man Pass to climb Peepsight Mountain. Much of this area had been through wildfires so the trail was mostly nonexistent. Thankfully more one-rock cairns were there to guide the way. From the pass, the north ridge route actually looked doable. So we negotiated Point 7990 from its south slopes and arrived at Peepsight Mountain’s north saddle shortly after leaving the pass.

Looking back
Looking back

Photos from this trip can be found here.

The north ridge route turned out to be quite straightforward, and gentle, we ascended on or east of the ridge crest. A couple of minor knobs and large boulders to negotiate but overall no issues. We enjoyed a good hour of breakfast and savored beautiful morning views before leaving the summit for our next objective–Freds Mountain. As per usual, it looked much farther than on the map.

Peepsight awaits
 Peepsight awaits

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Ridge traverse was about three times the distance of going from Andrew Peak to Amos Peak, with several more knobs to get over or around. Lots of boulder hopping and side stepping fun to be had. Before getting to Wilma, the last high point south of Freds Mountain, we traversed leisurely by keeping a steady elevation of 7,600′ on west slopes.

Ashnola River Basin with Peepsight Lake
Ashnola River Basin with Peepsight Lake

Photos from this trip can be found here.

I first mistook Wilma for Fred Mountain’s actual high point until I peeked around Wilma at 7,800′. OMG, there’s more, with at least another half a mile to go! Although this part of the ridge was gentler and much easier to traverse, so we could actually avoid the mass dense brush on the west slopes by staying on the crest.

Within reach
Within reach

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Of all the summits we visited in the last two days, Freds Mountain was the most spacious and the most elongated, with more than enough room and then some to house an entire army. It even had a tall cairn marking the highest point, hard to tell location of the true high point otherwise. Another fine viewpoint in the area on this warm and sunny day!

Back at ya, Peepsight
Back at ya, Peepsight

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Not wanting to run the ridge again, we poked around the top and found a feasible way down the steep northeast ridge and eventually exited from the adjacent gully down into the boggy and mosquito-infested Glory Creek Basin. Lots of loose rocks and choss in the gully, but it saved us a ton of time to reverse the ridge run to Peepsight Mountain to safely descend.

Northeast gully outro
Northeast gully outro

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Since the basin had been badly burned, we never located the trail on the map. So instead we followed the creek on its east and gradually ascended to the 7,200′ saddle due east of Glory Lake. Just past the saddle we found the trail from this morning and followed the cairns back to Rock Lake. Glad not to have seen any more bears since yesterday’s brief encounter.

Glory Creek Basin north view
Glory Creek Basin north view

Photos from this trip can be found here.

Back at camp, pup and I were both exhausted. We took a much-needed power nap before packing up for the 13-mile trek out to the car.

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