Gilbert Mountain + Marsupial Peak / 袋峯+吉爾伯特山

Some reports said to prepare for an all-day outing. So to get ourselves enough daylight, the pup and I slept in the car. That way, we would get an early start on Gilbert Mountain. If time allowed, we would also climb Marsupial Peak.

Gilbert Mountain from Marsupial Peak
Gilbert Mountain from Marsupial Peak

See more trip photos here.

Gilbert Mountain and Marsupial Peak at a Glance

Access: North Creek Trailhead
Round Trip: TBD
Elevation Range: 3600′-8023′

Gear: helmet
GPS Track:
available
Dog-Friendly: on the trail

North Creek Trail

We had a leisurely hike on the trail. Since the water level was low, we didn’t have problems crossing North Creek at 5100′. Later, we took a break in the lush meadow. It’s just past the junction with Cedar Creek Trail. Who knew the trail made its way into this basin from highway 20?

We somehow missed the old miner’s path. But I soon realized it as we were slowly going down toward North Lake. But that’s not where we needed to be today! So we backtracked a short distance, and I saw the big log over the junction. There I built a cairn, and then we walked up the forested trail.

Gilbert Mountain from the pond
Gilbert Mountain from the pond

See more trip photos here.

Marsupial Peak Climb

Before long, we were at the end of the miners’ trail in the clearing. Then I decided to add Marsupial Peak (Gilbert Mountain NW Peak) to the trip. So at 6700′, we went north into the south basin with a large talus. We first carefully sidestepped through boulders. Then we followed a rocky gully to the east of the headwall. It gave access to the top. We stayed on climbers’ right as we climbed up more rocks. Soon, we were at the base of the chossy summit block.

The incorrectly marked USGS high point took us up to the west of the broken ridgeline. The real summit was only 30-40 feet to the east. But we had to go back down and move east into the next gully. I spent some time finding a feasible route for the pup. But then he climbed the steep slabs up to the summit. I moved east into the next narrow gully. From there, I went up to the top through boulders.

North view
Northwest view

See more trip photos here.

Next Stop, Gilbert Mountain

The best part about this climb was seeing Washington Pass. But the nonstop rumbling sounds of motorbikes somewhat killed the mood. The summit had excellent views of Liberty Bell Mountain, Early Winters Spires, Kangaroo Ridge, Snagtooth Ridge, and Gardner Mountains. Gilbert Mountain, our next stop, was right across the basin.

We carefully made our way back down to the miner’s trail. Then we traversed through the old mines above North Lake. And that got us into the basin north of Point 7414. There was snow lower in the bowl. But higher up, we were walking on scree. Eventually, we made it up to the notch between Point 7483 and Point 7414. But the real climb would start here.

Getting around buttresses
Getting around buttresses

See more trip photos here.

Gilbert Mountain Summit Plus Views

For the most part, we were able to travel on the ridge crest. But sometimes we would drop onto the gentle southern slopes. Terrain steepened significantly in the last 400′ up to the summit. We tried bypassing and then regaining the ridgeline via the steep south gullies. But in retrospect, it would have been less time-consuming to stay on the ridge despite the exposure.

Just like Marsupial Peak, the beautiful weather treated us with more stunning views. Only this time, I got a better look into the Cedar Creek drainage. We were in that same valley two months earlier on the way to climbing Silver Moon.

Marsupial Peak from Gilbert Mountain
Marsupial Peak from Gilbert Mountain

See more trip photos here.

Outro

On the way down, I opted for the shortcut I read in one report. So we sidestepped through steep ribs and gullies. But it took much longer than expected. Eventually, we went up to the south ridge at 6000′, and I put on my headlamp there. Afterward, we went down 2000′ and got directly onto the trail. Then one mile of walking and we were back the car.

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