Camels Hump by Reynolds Peak / 靠雷諾茲峯的駱駝峰

We had a wonderful summer with fabulous weather. So I decided to take a break from the blog and channeled my energy toward getting outside. Camels Hump was our season opener this year. We came to Lake Chelan-Sawtooth Sawtooth Wilderness after last weekend’s trip.

Camels Hump summit beyond the ridgeline
Camels Hump summit beyond the ridgeline

See more trip photos here.

Camels Hump at a Glance

Access: Reynolds Creek Trailhead
Round Trip: TBD
Elevation Range: 3160′-8015′
Gear: helmet, snowshoes, ice ax
GPS Track: available
Dog-Friendly: with guidance

The Preface

Fall is just a few days away. So I finally sat down to gather my thoughts. Then I reminisced on the memorable moments over the past four months. The yellow pup and I continued our peak-bagging adventures. Meanwhile, the black lab enjoyed his time in boarding.

A recent trip report inspired me to start my summer season. I had no specific goals in mind. So we checked out two of the second hundred highest peaks of the state. I wasn’t sure about working on another list. So we started in one of my favorite places in the Cascades–Lake Chelan-Sawtooth Wilderness.

Lake Chelan-Sawtooth Wilderness
Lake Chelan-Sawtooth Wilderness

See more trip photos here.

Reynolds Creek Trail

We slept by the trailhead on Friday night. Then the next morning, we started hiking right before 7 AM. This trip was our second time in the Reynolds Creek Basin. The first time was in the summer of 2011. This time, we had enough snow en route. So glad we didn’t need to pole vault our way through the down trees.

Snow showed up on the trail at mile two. But I continued in boots for a while. From the creek, we were able to move quickly into the basin with the snow coverage. Thanks in part to the two climbers who went up to Reynolds Peak earlier. They left us with tracks to follow. I put on snowshoes right before going out of the forest. Then we continued through to the head of the drainage.

Camels Hump this way
Camels Hump this way

See more trip photos here.

Reynolds Creek Basin

The leftmost gully gave quick access to the upper basin. Soon, we were on the east ridge of Camels Hump at 7100′. After a break, we began to move west below the crest on steep slopes. Then shortly, we were on the ridge bump at 7680′.

Finally, we had our first view of Camels Hump here. The peak was just on the other end of the joining ridge. But the real summit was back behind the eastern slopes. The steep north face and corniced ridgeline soon forced us off the crest. But we continued on the steep south slopes above Tony Basin.

Tony Basin
Tony Basin

See more trip photos here.

Ridge Traverse to Camels Hump Summit

The terrain in the final 200′ was moderate. Earlier, I had mistaken the dry rocks above for the real summit. So I left the snowshoes there. Soon, I realized we weren’t at the top. But by then, it was too much of work to go back down and get the gear. So we punched through the snow in the last 100′ to go up to the top.

It was a clear day with abounding views. Reynolds Peak made up the bulk of the landscape to the north. The south face looked much less intimidating for sure. Oval Peak was part of the Wish Slam, and it dominated the southeastern skyline. There were so many Washington’s highest peaks around us. But we had so little time to savor them all.

Mount Gibbs
Mount Gibbs

See more trip photos here.

Outro

We took our sweet time to go back down to Reynolds Creek Basin. The snow had turned slushy by the afternoon. Right before crossing Reynolds Creek in the forest, we met a Mountaineers group. Among them were a couple of friends on their way to climbing Reynolds Peak.

It was Memorial Day weekend. So it was free to stay at the campsites along Twisp River Road. The pup and I then spent the night at the South Creek Campground. The area was sure quiet for a holiday week. We went to sleep right after dinner to get some rest for tomorrow’s outing.

Back to Reynolds Creek Basin
Back to Reynolds Creek Basin

See more trip photos here.

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