Tarzan Butte by Teanaway Butte via Jungle Creek / 泰山孤峯

  • Reading time:7 mins read

Tarzan Butte by Teanaway Butte rises above Jungle Creek and Rye Creek near Johnson Mountain. To the north stretch the expansive Stuart Range above Ingalls Creek. Meanwhile, the popular Twentynine Pines Campground rests at its eastern foothills.

Tarzan Butte holding down the fort
Tarzan Butte holding down the fort

See more trip photos here.

Tarzan Butte at a Glance

Access: NF-9701
Round Trip: 7.8 miles
Elevation Range: 2640′-4385′
Gear: none
GPS Track: available
Dog-Friendly: yes

The Preface

The weather had worsened since the first week of November. So after last Sunday’s outing, this weekend, we went to dodge the rain east of the mountain crest. This time, we explored Tarzan Butte west of the Teanaway River.

We made a trip up to Teanaway Butte six years ago. But it was all a blur because of the poor weather conditions. I also don’t remember seeing Tarzan Butte through the mists since I don’t have a photo of it.

See more trip photos here.

Walking the Road

I drove past Twentynine Pines Campground and then turned left onto Road 9701. Then in a quarter of a mile, I parked by the yellow gate with a junction behind it. We walked straight ahead while going uphill slightly. Later, we went out from the left fork.

As it turned out, many spur roads in this area were not on the map. But since most of them were brushy, it was apparent which one to follow. At 3200′, the roadway turned south and then went north at the next road bend.

The secret passage
The secret passage

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Tarzan Butte Summit with Spotty Views

Slowly, the road went north toward Tarzan Butte’s east ridge. Then it dwindled on the crest two miles in from the gate. At the end of the roadway were tall shrubs to go through. Then it was a short, steep scramble up to the summit.

Damage from Jolly Mountain Fire was evident from the massive burned trees. The southeast end marked the high point. But we took a break on the northeast side for the spotty views of Stuart Range plus Earl Peak and Navaho Peak.

Stuart Range panoramic view through trees
Stuart Range panoramic view through trees

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Back to Walking the Road

We got up here early in the day, so there was still lots of daylight. Then I decided to add some excitement to the trip by making a counterclockwise loop. It would allow us to go through Rye Creek Valley we had yet to visit. Seeing Camp Lake would also be a bonus.

From the summit, we went down the southwest ridge. After a short scramble, we were then down on the 3520′ saddle. Another 200′ of scrambling south through the dense forest brought us down to the road adjacent to Rye Creek. Then a moderate two-mile walk got us down by the wetland.

Camp Lake
Camp Lake

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Camp Lake Plus Outro

Other than the few hawks flying overhead occasionally, the lush valley was eerily quiet. The lake wasn’t as big as shown on the map. So I nearly missed it before the glistening water caught my eye. But with a name like Camp Lake, I’d assume many outdoor activities happen here during the high season.

Besides the lake, there wasn’t much to see here. After a quick snack break, we then started walking again. We were now a little over two miles from the gate. In the last mile, the road made a turn north. Just before the road bend, we went through some mud and tree piles. So that was exciting.

Welcome home
Welcome home

See more trip photos here.

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